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Art & Life with Haris Feratovic

Today we’d like to introduce you to Haris Feratovic.

Haris, please kick things off for us by telling us about yourself and your journey so far.
Imagine coloring your bodies of water as purple, and grass as orange. I found out at an early age that I had protanopia colorblindness. With protanopia colorblindness its different than just red and green, it also includes blue and green. Growing up I loved black and white over colors because I understood the definitions of the grey-scale. As I grew older, I realized that I had a knack for being able to recreate things that I saw.

In middle school, I started taking pieces of paper and folding them into bookmarks. Every bookmark was a new sketch or drawing, and once I was done with the book, it would spark the creation of another drawing. Mind you, these are all black and white. A friend of mine convinced me to try color pencils and man were those drawings a little off-kilter. Anytime I would try using colored pencils the colors just seemed to be the same blend terribly. It was always a battle trying to understand how I could place colors. I couldn’t even match my clothes, how was I going to learn how to work with colors?

In high-school I became more extroverted, athletic, confident (sometimes too confident), and art in my life at the time was just a doodle here and there during class. I was a first generation colorblind kid with a rebel complex and a goofiness to match. I wasn’t sure at the time what it was, but I felt a little different than the average at school like my head was in the clouds a little more than usual. This didn’t click for me until I made it to my college years. High school was where I was bouncing like a pinball through life lessons. College is where I explored the idea of the iceberg that was deeper.

Spring break of 2016 a friend had given me a few canvases and oil paints because she didn’t want them anymore. I was home alone, with a very heavy cloud above my head. I couldn’t shake it, none of my friends were available, and those were tougher times for me. So I grabbed the art supplies, a glass of Jameson and some Lo-fi music to drift with while I worked on whatever this piece was going to be. Paintbrush maintenance is a nuisance, and I took a glob of paint with my finger instead and started moving it around. Instantly I just started from color to color, shading, texture.

Now two years later I am taking what I have learned about myself, and the odd combination of things that I am. To create art.

Can you give our readers some background on your art?
I’m a self-taught oil finger painter. I take Winsor and Newton oil paints, and with gloves on, I push and smudge paint across canvases. The images I create however are usually random. At the moment I’m finishing a series of landscapes, each piece representing how I see landscapes as opposed to someone who isn’t colorblind. In a way, I feel like a lot of men are colorblind, and that’s why they didn’t pursue a talent they might have. I want them to know that they too can make art.

I want to show my viewers the world through my eyes. I want to evoke emotion as well as a curiosity. Some of my pieces are more simple because I want people to focus on the flow and feelings pushed into the canvas. Each piece is a piece of me. During the time that I paint something is connected to whatever I might have been going through or learning. In a way I want people to see through my eyes, and connect with me through my art.

Any advice for aspiring or new artists?
One of the biggest things that I would say to other artists, new to the game or veterans. To go easy on yourself. I’m the type of person that’s very hard on themselves, and I think had I not expected so much of myself instantly, I would have started pursuing my talent a lot sooner.

As far as lessons I wished I had learned was to not worry about rules. Art is malleable, it can be exact, or abstract. Another lesson I have learned recently that would have been helpful is to plan your piece. Whether its a sketch or a painting, always have your references and practice handy before jumping onto a larger project. It’s the absolute worst feeling to start working on something and realized you completely missed something that was major in the composition.

What’s the best way for someone to check out your work and provide support?
At the moment I post regularly (4-7 times a week) to my Instagram and Facebook pages “@Harisferatiart. I also have an Etsy shop which is also titled “Haris Ferati Art.” On November 9th I’m having a one night showing for my series in Denton, Texas at Studio E. There I’ll be live-painting, with some groovy beats and BYOB it’s going to be a great time. The best part is that is absolutely free. I want people to come hang out and connect through art.

Past that I’m a contributor to Denton Gallery and Artists Enclave in Denton. Sometimes there are pop up exhibitions and showings where my art will be, and that is posted on my social pages. I’m releasing a website where people can view and purchase my art, which will be “Harisferatiart.com.” I’m beyond excited for that, everything has slowly been coming together. The finish line is in sight.

Past that I’m a contributor to Denton Gallery, and Artists Enclave in Denton. Sometimes there are pop up exhibitions and showings where my art will be, and that is posted on my social pages. I’m releasing a website where people can view and purchase my art, which will be “Harisferatiart.com.” I’m beyond excited for that, everything has slowly been coming together. The finish line is in sight.

Contact Info:

Image Credit:
Edgar Sanchez

Getting in touch: VoyageDallas is built on recommendations from the community; it’s how we uncover hidden gems, so if you know someone who deserves recognition please let us know here.

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